"Electronic LEGO Super Mario Bros. Invincibility Starmen" by Baron von Brunk

Tutorial on Instructables - Video Demonstration

Tapping the small button on the back of the head causes the eyes to blink in sync with a tone melody version of the Super Mario invincibility theme, with each musical note assigned to a specific frequency generated by Arduino tone library. The rainbow model’s eyes, however, cycle through multi colors and play the Super Mario Bros. 3 “Coin Heaven” music (song by Koji Kondo). Technical specs per model: ~300 LEGO pieces, 6 Volts DC (2x 3V CR2032 coin cells), two LEDs (white straw hat; RGB color-changing for rainbow version), sound: piezo speaker, microcontroller: Amtel ATtiny85 programmed with Arduino Uno.

-Baron von Brunk

Comments
For those of you in Deutschland, be on the lookout for my interview in the German video game magazine Games Aktuell — in a feature for gaming fan art and LEGO creations! With all of my press in Europe as of this year, I’m optimistic that eventually soon LEGO Group in Denmark will take notice too…-Baron von Brunk

For those of you in Deutschland, be on the lookout for my interview in the German video game magazine Games Aktuell — in a feature for gaming fan art and LEGO creations! With all of my press in Europe as of this year, I’m optimistic that eventually soon LEGO Group in Denmark will take notice too…
-Baron von Brunk

Comments

"Illuminated Mosaic LEGO Spiritual Stone Lamp" - original LEGO creation and photos by Baron von Brunk.

Based on my popular mosaic Super Mario Bros. lamp from winter 2013, I made a slightly modified version of my own design — using an intricate new triangular fashion that employs LEGO hinge bricks, as well as a SNOT (studs not on top) pattern for the roof. The sprite patterns were designed by me, using images of the 3D game items as references.

Output power: 13 Watt, 880 Lumen 5,500K CFL bulb, candelabra base.

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

"Vantage", LEGO Game Boy Advance Transformer by Baron von Brunk. Check out the tutorial on Instructables to build your own!

At last, the next LEGOformer in my most popular series — Vantage, a powerful robot that transforms into a Nintendo Game Boy Advance, armed with battery blasters and parody “Boom” automatic shotgun! With a basic design much akin to my Game Boy robot Domaster, along with a refined transformation cycle similar to that of my Game Gear robot Gearhead, this new figure is very sturdy and well-articulated. My previous LEGOformers were built “organically”, as in I’d compile a ton of relevant pieces and build the robot via trial and error — whilst this particular one was my first to be almost entirely designed on the computer with LEGO Digital Designer before being physically built and tested. That being said, the 3D instructional guide was released simultaneously. What was the most challenging part? That Boom shotgun: I spent several days trying to make one that looks like an actual gun as well as having the ability to be held by the robot as a weapon. I chose Doom since that was my favorite GBA game I played in high school back in 2002. My second favorite GBA game was Namco Museum!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

"Illuminated Mosaic LEGO Legend of Zelda Portrait/Lamp" by Baron von Brunk. Check out the tutorial on Instructables, so you can build your own!

Using the same design principles of my Nintendo World Mosaic from fall 2013, in conjunction with my mosaic “Lite Brite” mood lamps from December, I’ve combined both ideas and created a flat mosaic sprite portrait with hollow innards lined with bright LED strips! The light from the LEDs illuminate the colored LEGO dots plugged into a mosaic grid of Technic bricks, thus mimicking a “Lite Brite” effect. Each LED strip is soldered into a series circuit with 24 gauge wires, then connected to a switch and a female DC adapter plug. The grid of LED strips is attached to a rear door which opens/closes via LEGO hinge bricks.

Electrical power: 12VDC
LED strips: 16 feet (~5 meters)

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

"The Incursion" - a new LEGO diorama featuring some of the mini ships from my popular Super Mario Bros. 3 airship “Fireflower” - along with some new mosaic sprite background items, and photographed with my new Nikon D5200 with its f/1.8 macro lens! I’m thinking of making one of the World 8 battleships next.

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

Hangin’ With Mr. Koopa by Baron von Brunk

Way back in late 2011, I built several minifigure-scale Koopa Troopas to use amongst the scenery of my then work-in-progress Super Mario 3 Fireflower Airship. I decided against using them, and instead opted to have the airship display streamlined and less cluttered. These are a few of the winged minions; I think I built about 20 originally, half with wings half without. Underneath these Koopas is the tiled mosaic Nintendo World Store Platform from spring 2013.

Comments

Mosaic LEGO Super Mario Bros. Lamp by Julius von Brunk

Technical details: E12 Candelabra CFL bulb, 580 lumen, 9 Watts, 5,000K CRI.

Based on my previous mosaic Super Mario Bros. LEGO lamp from 2012, which used a stained glass effect, this new model uses a clever rigging of Technic bricks and transparent dots to mimic a Lite Brite set!

To build your own, check out my tutorial on Instructables to build your own — and make sure to vote for this in the Make it Glow contest!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

"Dark Link Battle" - original LEGO creation by Baron von Brunk

This is another large creation photographed in my new makeshift light tent, using PVC pipes, white linen, and powerful 5,000K daylight CFL bulbs. In this particular diorama, I depict a famous mini boss battle from everyone’s favorite temple of all time — the Water Temple!

These two figurines are of course clones of my Mecha Link 1.0 model. Click here for a tutorial on how to build your own!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

Wolfenstein 3D Gatling Gun - original LEGO creation by Baron von Brunk.

This bad boy shall soon be used as a prop in a forthcoming photo session I’m getting done! By the way, this was the first LEGO creation to be photographed in my new makeshift light tent for taking pictures of large items. That being said, you’ll expect to see a lot of bigger LEGO models made from me in the future!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

With a lot of my best LEGO creations, fans typically keep telling me the same thing: "I want to build my own! Why don’t you post instructions!?" — in fact, whenever I receive any sort of backlash for my works, it stems from my lack of building instructions. The fact of the matter is, making custom instructions for my models is a difficult process, as it often requires taking my creations apart and reverse-engineering them. Also, very few of my works are made with detailed plans and chronicling — rather, the process involves acquiring tons of parts within a certain color family, making a huge pile, and throwing together trial & error mockups until I have a refined LEGO model. For instance, my giant Super Mario 3 airship was made using a clever method of side panels riveted on an internal structure — and the method of doing this process came to me whilst I was drunk. I spent weeks trying to make a system for having the faux wooden LEGO bricks facing sideways whilst keeping an internal structure facing upwards in a traditional stud pattern. Then one Saturday night, I drank a case of Rolling Rock, a whole bottle of wine, and half a can of Four Loko as my classic rock playlist queued up “Hawks & Doves” by Neil Young — then I saw a bunch of colors, blacked out, and found a crude mockup of my ingenious LEGO rivet system on my bed — which was apparently thought-up and built whilst I was drunk!* Ergo, despite the crazy, elaborate technical details of my famous LEGO creations, there’s actually not a detailed blueprint system nor a scientific process like a lot of people suspect; rather, there’s a lot of frustration, anger, heavy rock, and drunken debauchery that goes on during my extensive late night LEGO-building sessions.

WITH THAT SAID, I decided to make a custom instructional guide for my recent Mecha Link 1.0 figure — which was initially intended to be my “Hero Factory” mashup of Link from Legend of Zelda, but instead kind of evolved into a robotic battle figure, akin to Japanese mecha (on par with Mobile Suit Gundam). This particular figure was first made by me, then once finalized was then manufactured into three more clones: fire tunic Link, water tunic Link, and Dark Link — all built virtually identical (sans the colors and parts substitutions where applicable), and therefore follow the base model of Link 1.0 — hence his name. This model is intended to be copied and replicated by you fellow LEGO builders out there, so that you can make your own variations, be they direct copies of the green model, colored variants, original styles, or even improvements in flexibility — as in, a Link 2.0 figure of sorts. Unlike my Nintendo 64 Transformer, to which all sorts of angry fans demanded a building guide (which I personally wouldn’t recommend anyway, as building that sucker was like assembling a car from scratch), I’m publicly releasing 3D instructions for Mecha Link 1.0 right off the bat, and encouraging any builder to make their own!

This following instructional guide and parts list have all been generated in LEGO Digital Designer, which is a 3D CAD program (free to download and use), and similar to LDraw — only with a more simplified user interface. Once you’ve downloaded LDD and my Link.lxf file, run the software and load the particular .lxf file to bring up Mecha Link 1.0; the rest is self-explanatory, as the step-by-step process and parts list can be found in the “Building Guide Mode” option. In the Build Mode section, you can move around pieces virtually to make changes and swap colors.

NOTES: This is not an easy build! This particular creation uses well over 300 pieces just for the body, and like my previous custom models, should not be attempted by the novice builder with a limited budget. Also, I haven’t included any weapons nor shield tutorials in the file, since those particular items were made with rare Bionicle and Hero Factory pieces not found in LDD’s library and employed unorthodox techniques for stylization — hence, I encourage you to make your own substitutions and original ideas for weapons. Another thing to point out is that some pieces literally don’t exist in various color swatches: notably, Link’s wedge slope for making his hat, which is available in green, red, and black, but not blue — hence, if you look at the rear photo of blue Link, his hat looks slightly different! Use your best judgement of making parts substitutions when necessary — and don’t limit yourself to these particular color options: make a yellow Link, make a solid white Link, or even a pink & purple one — it’s up to you! LDD has the ability to swap colors in the 3D guide I designed, thus you’re able to make your own virtual clones before you ultimately acquire parts and build one.

-Baron von Brunk

*I’m of course of legal drinking age, and although I’m a “tweener” as far as a personality is concerned (in wrestling lingo, tweener means anti-hero, neither babyface nor heel), I’m not advocating the excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages whilst making LEGO creations. I am, however bluntly stating for the record that excessive alcohol consumption was in fact present during some of my engineering obstacles in the past, and that I’m not trying to hide behind the guise of a squeaky clean image. Mecha Link 1.0 and all of his components were conceptualized and built during complete sobriety on my part, and the only real “crazy drunk” times have been in the development of my Fireflower Airship and Domaster Game Boy Transformer (the latter only involved minor drunkeness).

Comments
Comments

The first phase of my next custom LEGO creations, here’s an articulated figurine of Link (as circa Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time era) in an artistically-transformed mode — inspired by Japanese mechas, à la Mobile Suit Gundam! This particular figure is the original base model that I built; three more variants are currently being manufactured and photographed by me. Stay tuned for the next three versions from this series of custom LEGO figures — and eventually an instructional guide with parts list so that you can build your own!

Check back for updates… The WILL be more of this series!

-Baron von Brunk

P.S. - The hard part? The shield. That damn shield.

Comments

The LEGO / Nintendo 64 / Transformer project - original creation(s) by Baron von Brunk of New York, NY.

Full unabridged photo shoots (photos taken by me):
Instructables Flickr MOCPages Facebook

Created specifically for the Instructables Toy Block Contest in the summer of 2013, I present to you my latest LEGOformers: Ultra Hexacon and Tetragon, the transforming Nintendo 64 and controller, along with their transforming game pak minions Hot-Shot, and Mecha Kong! These original LEGO models are made in near-perfect size and proportions to authentic N64 components, and can transform completely — by “transform completely”, I mean each robot can transform from N64 accessory to robot and back without detaching/removing parts, with the exception of Tetragon’s controller cord. Ultra Hexacon is to this date, my most durable and articulated Transformer model built, with great flexibility and joint strength; he can also stand and be posed without falling over or having pieces break off. With the exception of the custom stickers/labels, every single piece in these toys are 100% LEGO — bricks, plates, slopes, tiles, wedges, and Technic parts. No glue, paint, cutting, nor 3rd party custom pieces.

As with previous LEGOformers, there were multiple engineering obstacles; Ultra Hexacon’s first issue was coming up with a transformation cycle that didn’t involve the cartridge slot appearing where his ass would be in robot mode, so that games could slide into his chest like Soundwave or Blaster (as opposed to be inserted like a suppository). Building the head was a challenge, and one particular idea was to have his head remove and transform into a Rumble Pak, like a Transformers Headmaster toy — or even adding a slot for the N64 Expansion Pak that would either double as a head or a weapon! Hexacon’s transformation cycle was based off an Autobot cassette named Eject — a favorite toy of mine as a kid, and his physical appearance was intended originally to be a blend between Ultra Magnus and Metroplex — but ended up looking more like a hybrid of Fortress Maximus or Generation 2 “tank” Megatron. His base color is dark grey like the N64 console, and his secondary color scheme represents the colors of the N64 logo, sans gold. Ultra Hexacon’s power supply pack transforms into a shoulder-mounted rocket launcher, with Tetragon’s memory card doubling as an ammo magazine for Hexacon’s shoulder weapon!

The games and controller took the longest to make. In fact, Mecha Kong was almost scrapped entirely, as the method of making his arms bigger than this legs to create the ape-like appearance took quite a long time to figure out. Tetragon (the controller) was originally intended to be an anthropomorphic robot and not an animal, but after days of trying to make a transformation cycle with failed results, I opted to make him turn into a scorpion — which personally looks a lot more badass yet quirky — almost like Beast Wars! Tetragon’s controller cord is made from a rare elongated Technic pneumatic rubber hose piece. Hot-Shot, the GoldenEye 007 cartridge was supposed to be Hexacon’s gun (like Megatron’s gun mode being used by Starscream) — with the possibility of him being a Triplechanger — gun, robot, and game — but ended up being too big to fit in his hands. Some games that were conceptualized but scrapped were “Cruiser”, a Crusi’n USA cartridge that transforms into a car, “Shadow”, a Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire game that changes into a Stormtrooper, and multiple bird/plane robots that would either change into Star Fox 64, Pilotwings 64 or Chopper Attack. Also, I did in fact completely build a transforming robot version of Link that changed into a golden Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time cartridge — BUT, unfortunately right before the photo shoot I ran into a few errors with his size and sticker placement, thus I omitted him with the intention of possibly displaying him again in the future, once I’ve made the necessary repairs; in fact, I was hoping to include him to show my respect for fellow Zelda aficionados like myself!

What’s in a name? “Hexacontatetragon" is the proper nomenclature for a 64-sided polygon, and Nintendo 64 being the first 3D polygon-based Nintendo system with 64-bit graphics, the names "Hexacon" and "Tetragon" (the robot and the scorpion) merge as a gestalt when transformed — both physically and in name! The word "Ultra" in the title is an homage to the Nintendo 64’s original name of "Ultra 64" before its North American release.

- Baron von Brunk

Comments
Here’s an original creation that I built exclusively for Nintendo World Store in April. This was intended to be a platform to go underneath my full-scale replica of a Nintendo Wii U and controller made from LEGO bricks, but alas, I decided to keep both units — the platform and the Wii U/controller — separate in the glass case — as this tiled mosaic was too pretty to be covered up predominantly by the Wii U model! When kept on display at Nintendo World, I originally had a few imperfections in the pixel design, notably the Piranha Plant — which I’ve repaired specially for this photo shoot. As of now, only two imperfections remain: the right-hand coin has a black pixel in the wrong spot, and the warp pipe is too short by one line of pixels. To create this project, I used MS Paint to design a custom 96 x 96 composite image of various Super Mario Bros. items/characters, then enlarged the image as a reference for laying out the LEGO tiles and plates. In my composite image, I deviated a bit from the genuine NES sprites by adding more colors to create the effect of shading and vibrant hues. Underneath the tiles are two 48 x 48 LEGO baseplates, with a layer of bricks and plates on top of them, to maintain a rigid surface for the mosaic design.
Right here’s the original reference image I created, so you can compare the before and after progress. As you can see, I clearly didn’t have enough 1x1 plates/tiles of blue and sky blue, hence I made the final sky background with lines, rather than dots; also, I had to make some substitutions with colors, as with the shades of tan and grey with the Koopa and Goombas.

-Baron von Brunk

Here’s an original creation that I built exclusively for Nintendo World Store in April. This was intended to be a platform to go underneath my full-scale replica of a Nintendo Wii U and controller made from LEGO bricks, but alas, I decided to keep both units — the platform and the Wii U/controller — separate in the glass case — as this tiled mosaic was too pretty to be covered up predominantly by the Wii U model! When kept on display at Nintendo World, I originally had a few imperfections in the pixel design, notably the Piranha Plant — which I’ve repaired specially for this photo shoot. As of now, only two imperfections remain: the right-hand coin has a black pixel in the wrong spot, and the warp pipe is too short by one line of pixels.

To create this project, I used MS Paint to design a custom 96 x 96 composite image of various Super Mario Bros. items/characters, then enlarged the image as a reference for laying out the LEGO tiles and plates. In my composite image, I deviated a bit from the genuine NES sprites by adding more colors to create the effect of shading and vibrant hues. Underneath the tiles are two 48 x 48 LEGO baseplates, with a layer of bricks and plates on top of them, to maintain a rigid surface for the mosaic design.

Right here’s the original reference image I created, so you can compare the before and after progress. As you can see, I clearly didn’t have enough 1x1 plates/tiles of blue and sky blue, hence I made the final sky background with lines, rather than dots; also, I had to make some substitutions with colors, as with the shades of tan and grey with the Koopa and Goombas.

-Baron von Brunk

Comments