"Illuminated Mosaic LEGO Legend of Zelda Portrait/Lamp" by Baron von Brunk. Check out the tutorial on Instructables, so you can build your own!

Using the same design principles of my Nintendo World Mosaic from fall 2013, in conjunction with my mosaic “Lite Brite” mood lamps from December, I’ve combined both ideas and created a flat mosaic sprite portrait with hollow innards lined with bright LED strips! The light from the LEDs illuminate the colored LEGO dots plugged into a mosaic grid of Technic bricks, thus mimicking a “Lite Brite” effect. Each LED strip is soldered into a series circuit with 24 gauge wires, then connected to a switch and a female DC adapter plug. The grid of LED strips is attached to a rear door which opens/closes via LEGO hinge bricks.

Electrical power: 12VDC
LED strips: 16 feet (~5 meters)

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

With a lot of my best LEGO creations, fans typically keep telling me the same thing: "I want to build my own! Why don’t you post instructions!?" — in fact, whenever I receive any sort of backlash for my works, it stems from my lack of building instructions. The fact of the matter is, making custom instructions for my models is a difficult process, as it often requires taking my creations apart and reverse-engineering them. Also, very few of my works are made with detailed plans and chronicling — rather, the process involves acquiring tons of parts within a certain color family, making a huge pile, and throwing together trial & error mockups until I have a refined LEGO model. For instance, my giant Super Mario 3 airship was made using a clever method of side panels riveted on an internal structure — and the method of doing this process came to me whilst I was drunk. I spent weeks trying to make a system for having the faux wooden LEGO bricks facing sideways whilst keeping an internal structure facing upwards in a traditional stud pattern. Then one Saturday night, I drank a case of Rolling Rock, a whole bottle of wine, and half a can of Four Loko as my classic rock playlist queued up “Hawks & Doves” by Neil Young — then I saw a bunch of colors, blacked out, and found a crude mockup of my ingenious LEGO rivet system on my bed — which was apparently thought-up and built whilst I was drunk!* Ergo, despite the crazy, elaborate technical details of my famous LEGO creations, there’s actually not a detailed blueprint system nor a scientific process like a lot of people suspect; rather, there’s a lot of frustration, anger, heavy rock, and drunken debauchery that goes on during my extensive late night LEGO-building sessions.

WITH THAT SAID, I decided to make a custom instructional guide for my recent Mecha Link 1.0 figure — which was initially intended to be my “Hero Factory” mashup of Link from Legend of Zelda, but instead kind of evolved into a robotic battle figure, akin to Japanese mecha (on par with Mobile Suit Gundam). This particular figure was first made by me, then once finalized was then manufactured into three more clones: fire tunic Link, water tunic Link, and Dark Link — all built virtually identical (sans the colors and parts substitutions where applicable), and therefore follow the base model of Link 1.0 — hence his name. This model is intended to be copied and replicated by you fellow LEGO builders out there, so that you can make your own variations, be they direct copies of the green model, colored variants, original styles, or even improvements in flexibility — as in, a Link 2.0 figure of sorts. Unlike my Nintendo 64 Transformer, to which all sorts of angry fans demanded a building guide (which I personally wouldn’t recommend anyway, as building that sucker was like assembling a car from scratch), I’m publicly releasing 3D instructions for Mecha Link 1.0 right off the bat, and encouraging any builder to make their own!

This following instructional guide and parts list have all been generated in LEGO Digital Designer, which is a 3D CAD program (free to download and use), and similar to LDraw — only with a more simplified user interface. Once you’ve downloaded LDD and my Link.lxf file, run the software and load the particular .lxf file to bring up Mecha Link 1.0; the rest is self-explanatory, as the step-by-step process and parts list can be found in the “Building Guide Mode” option. In the Build Mode section, you can move around pieces virtually to make changes and swap colors.

NOTES: This is not an easy build! This particular creation uses well over 300 pieces just for the body, and like my previous custom models, should not be attempted by the novice builder with a limited budget. Also, I haven’t included any weapons nor shield tutorials in the file, since those particular items were made with rare Bionicle and Hero Factory pieces not found in LDD’s library and employed unorthodox techniques for stylization — hence, I encourage you to make your own substitutions and original ideas for weapons. Another thing to point out is that some pieces literally don’t exist in various color swatches: notably, Link’s wedge slope for making his hat, which is available in green, red, and black, but not blue — hence, if you look at the rear photo of blue Link, his hat looks slightly different! Use your best judgement of making parts substitutions when necessary — and don’t limit yourself to these particular color options: make a yellow Link, make a solid white Link, or even a pink & purple one — it’s up to you! LDD has the ability to swap colors in the 3D guide I designed, thus you’re able to make your own virtual clones before you ultimately acquire parts and build one.

-Baron von Brunk

*I’m of course of legal drinking age, and although I’m a “tweener” as far as a personality is concerned (in wrestling lingo, tweener means anti-hero, neither babyface nor heel), I’m not advocating the excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages whilst making LEGO creations. I am, however bluntly stating for the record that excessive alcohol consumption was in fact present during some of my engineering obstacles in the past, and that I’m not trying to hide behind the guise of a squeaky clean image. Mecha Link 1.0 and all of his components were conceptualized and built during complete sobriety on my part, and the only real “crazy drunk” times have been in the development of my Fireflower Airship and Domaster Game Boy Transformer (the latter only involved minor drunkeness).

Comments

The first phase of my next custom LEGO creations, here’s an articulated figurine of Link (as circa Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time era) in an artistically-transformed mode — inspired by Japanese mechas, à la Mobile Suit Gundam! This particular figure is the original base model that I built; three more variants are currently being manufactured and photographed by me. Stay tuned for the next three versions from this series of custom LEGO figures — and eventually an instructional guide with parts list so that you can build your own!

Check back for updates… The WILL be more of this series!

-Baron von Brunk

P.S. - The hard part? The shield. That damn shield.

Comments
"OGELNIKUFESIN"  — the Baron von Brunk Collection! 
My ultimate collage of my best custom creations and minifigures from the past two years, many of which are still intact in my workshop. Not shown: some of the Nintendo World Exclusives, notably my mosaic composite image of NES characters (which has been dismantled and shall be rebuilt to be larger).
-Baron von Brunk

"OGELNIKUFESIN" — the Baron von Brunk Collection!

My ultimate collage of my best custom creations and minifigures from the past two years, many of which are still intact in my workshop. Not shown: some of the Nintendo World Exclusives, notably my mosaic composite image of NES characters (which has been dismantled and shall be rebuilt to be larger).

-Baron von Brunk

Comments
Yo dawg, I heard you like Nintendo.

Yo dawg, I heard you like Nintendo.

Comments

LEGO City: Undercover Release Party at Nintendo World Store in Rockefeller Center!

In early 2013, after the publicity of my giant LEGO NES controller, Nintendo of America commissioned me to create a custom display to promote their spring 2013 release of “LEGO City: Undercover”. I gradually worked on most of these creations throughout January-March 2013, and unveiled them at the flagship store on Saturday April 6th. I was also invited to stay the whole day and greet customers, as I proudly displayed several of my other popular Nintendo-themed LEGO models! What you see here are the various LEGO creations all made by me, which are currently on display at the Rockefeller Center — and shall remain in the glass case until the end of the month — whereupon some will get permanently displayed! (taken on April 6th, 2013)

I felt rather honored to keep my famous Game Boy Transformer in a glass case alongside the Operation Desert Storm battle damaged Game Boy — made me feel like a real American! Unfortunately, I could only fit a few of the Fireflower Airship's mini ships, and not the bow and stern. The Lake Hylia scientist was omitted due to his size (and lack of space), and the Super Mario coin block lamp wasn’t plugged in. Regardless, I hung out by my display all afternoon and met a ton of new fans — many of which were young LEGO builders to whom I gave encouragement! Don’t waste your time following instructions… Instead, create your own original stuff that rocks — such as transforming Nintendo accessories!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

Baron von Brunk’s LEGO-Nintendo Exhibit at Rockefeller Center — LEGO City Undercover Release Party!

Nintendo of America has commissioned me to create a large Wii U diorama to kick off LEGO City Undercover. On Saturday April 6th at the Nintendo World Store in Rockefeller Plaza (NYC), I’ll be at the store from 12-4 PM to show off several of my best Nintendo-themed LEGO creations! I apologize for the muffled sound quality with this video, as there were technical issues.

Stop on by and bring me some cans of Monster, and maybe later I’ll buy you a pizza!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

"Deku Scrub Link!"

The next component in my LEGO of Zelda series, here we have our hero Link clad in his majestic Deku scrub mask and thus transformed into an anthropomorphic plant stage! Fun fact: the original concept behind this statue was to have a hollow head with a spring mechanism in the mouth — which would launch LEGO pieces similar to Deku nuts! Unfortunately, due to time and engineering issues, I scrapped the idea and simply made him a stationary statue with a solid head.

I completed this whole project in about 14 hours, give or take. There were no parts shortages this time — rather, the hindrances were some obstacles such as the feet (which use a mix of traditional and SNOT “studs not on top” methods), as well as getting a sturdy way to keep the arms attached. Also, the basic statue was built in its entirety the night before the completed project was photographed — but alas, I felt as if the original head was too small and narrow, which made Deku Link look wonky and squished. Thus, I kept the body intact and spent the previous few hours completely rebuilding the head to be fatter and overall larger — to be more game accurate — as Deku Link’s head was like a round ball in the game.

This creation, as well as most of my previous Nintendo-related creations will be put in Nintendo World Store’s museum on Saturday April 6th for the release party of LEGO City Undercover! Come by to the Rockefeller Center if you’re in the New York area, and from 12-4 PM I’ll be at the store to show off my creations!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

image image

Motorized LEGO Bombchu!

Next in my LEGO of Zelda series, here’s one of my funnest projects yet - a motorized Bombchu model! Using the magic of a rare early 1980s LEGO wind-up car motor, I’ve made this little explosive mousey completely mobile! Albeit, it doesn’t leave a red, glowing streak (nor explode on impact). Turn the red key, find a smooth surface, and watch this little bugger do its thing!

I think I’m going to grab a few of these and head on over to the “bowling alley” with that cute purple haired chick. In the meantime, take a peek at the demonstration video (with my well-endowed NES controller as a stage!)

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

First leaked photos of the basement dungeon of my forthcoming LEGO model of The Great Deku Tree! Almost like something out of Minecraft, eh? This is the bottom floor; after this shall be the ground floor, or the main room with the big Skulltula web in the center. The third stage on top will eventually be the tree itself, complete with opened mouth and a group of Kokiri kids!

The spider webs and blue water are a nice touch, if I must say.

You’ll have to forgive the crudity of these photos: the lighting was all off, hence the quality is crappy.

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

The Lake Hylia marine scientist LIVES (despite his deathly appearance)!!!

A random whim project I began working on a few months back, starting with the head; this is the next model in my ongoing “LEGO of Zelda” series. The freakish scientist statue stands about 2 feet tall, uses hundreds of pieces and is rather rickety (and a bit heavy)! The most difficult task was trying to attach the head to the body: my original plan was to have the head tilted at an awkward angle, just as the scientist in the game, to make him appear more “hunchback”-like…

Unfortunately, there was no efficient way to use Technic pieces to have the head tilted without having it snap off, ergo I had to just make it fixed in place at a standard angle to ensure security.The arms are also kind of rickety, as they were the second-to-last to be built, and were thrown together kind of slapdash. With more planning and acquiring pieces, I’d probably have made stronger arm joints which could securely hold a bottle of potion or whatnot. By the way, it took me three whole photo shoots to get this final set! With his large size, I was originally unable to cram him into my light tent, and thus had to build makeshift light riggings using sheets and messing with my camera’s light balance. I was finally able to fit him in the tent and sacrifice multiple angles for the sake of better lighting. As you can tell, I had to crank up the saturation and levels in Photoshop to fix the images, as it’s difficult to film white on white.

As stated previously, the head was created first (a few weeks ago), and the body was just built overnight last night. I stayed up until 4 am watching “To Catch a Predator” re-runs, chugging Turkey Hill Iced Tea, listening to my classic rock mix and pressing hundreds of blue and white LEGO bricks together to bring you this eerie man of science! Mosey on down to the Lakeside Laboratory to pay this old man a visit, and maybe you could treat him to some delicious fried frog eyeballs! Uhoy hoy hoo houy hoy!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

"Deku Baba Attack!"

The next vignette in my ongoing LEGO of Zelda series, here we have a vicious Deku Baba about to lunge forth and attack some innocent Kokiri kids! Get a load of the fallen warrior in the grass — he wasn’t so lucky…

-Baron von Brunk

Comments

The LEGO Skulltula - does it not frighten you and fill you with awe!?

Lately I decided to shift gears a bit and go from doing Mario to Zelda themes in my work. A forthcoming project of mine shall be a large Deku Tree replica, which will be a multi-level playset, kind of like a Mighty Max toy. On the bottom of the playset will be a boss — and this Skulltula was originally intended to be the it! I wanted the Skulltula to be much smaller, and perhaps to make several to place throughout the Deku Tree dungeon, but unfortunately I had to sacrifice the compact size for greater detail. Henceforth, the Skulltula you see is rather large and would be too big to put in the 48x48 wide Deku Tree diorama (unless I pass it off as being some kind of colossal mutant Skulltila or whatnot — and somehow cram it in there).

I built this just a few hours ago, and photographed it with my Sony camera and light tent. Be on the lookout for more Zelda-themed projects, notably the Deku Tree with an array of Kokiri kid minifigures!

-Baron von Brunk

Comments